Pink grapefruit drizzle cake

Pink grapefruit drizzle cake – the perfect balance between sharp and sweet!

https://somethingsweetsomethingsavoury.com/2018/02/11/sticky-toffee-pudding-pancakes/amp//#recipejump

The dreaded lurgy came into our lives last week.

We have all been affected in one way or another, but for some reason it has attached itself to me and will not let go. The sniffly cold I’ve had since New Year seemed to turn into a God awful flu like virus which left me unable to move from my bed for 3 days. Luckily I’m on holiday this week, so I have the option of hibernating from the outside world. I’ve not done that much apart from drinking lots of honey lemon and ginger tea, reading (by which I mean questionable hours scrolling through Instagram and Pinterest) and cuddling my little boy. He’s had a snuffly cold for weeks now, poor baby. I’m really starting to tire of Winter now. I never thought I’d say that. I usually embrace the Winter months – I’ve never really been a Summer person – but this one seems to have gone on forever.

Maybe my subconscious need for a little sunshine was the reason behind my decision to bake with citrus. I usually reach for lemons or oranges, but when I was out shopping a couple of weeks ago I spotted some pretty pink grapefruits. 50p for 4. At that bargain price, I couldn’t resist them.

I was dreaming of either a pink grapefruit curd filled, fluffy meringue topped tart or a zesty, syrup drenched drizzle cake. The drizzle won this time only because it was the easier option. But that tart is so on my bake list…

Back to the drizzle though. This cake is delicious. Light, fluffy and sticky with syrup. A little semolina lightens up the texture a little and brings a slight yellow sunshine colour. It’s a nice addition but by no means essential, so if you don’t have any semolina in your cupboard you could just add another 50g of flour.

It’s crucial that the syrup is cool when your pour it over the cake. If it’s hot, it will pour right through your cake and make it soggy. Not a huge disaster, but you won’t get that gorgeous sticky, sugary top that is so desirable.

pink grapefruit drizzle cake

You will need a 20cm round springform cake tin

200g caster sugar

Finely grated zest of 2 pink grapefruits

200g soft butter

4 medium eggs, beaten

150g self raising flour

1 tsp baking powder

50g fine semolina

For the syrup:

80g granulated sugar

Juice of one pink grapefruit

Preheat the oven to 180C/160F. Grease and line the base of your tin with parchment.

Place the sugar and grapefruit zest in a large bowl. Using your fingers, rub the zest into the sugar until the sugar is damp and fragrant from the zest oils. Add the butter and cream the mixture until very light and fluffy.

Add the eggs, beating well after each addition. Sieve the flour, baking powder and fine semolina together and fold into the mixture. Pour into your tin and bake for 40-45 minutes or until the cake is golden and springs back when the top is lightly pressed.* A skewer inserted into the middle of the cake should come out clean. Leave to cool in the tin for 10 minutes before turning out onto a wire rack with a plate underneath to catch any drips.

*While the cake is in the oven you need to make the syrup. The syrup should be cold when you pour it over the warm cake. Place the granulated sugar and grapefruit juice in a small pan and heat gently. Let it bubble gently for a few minutes until it reduces slightly and looks syrupy. Remove from the heat and set aside for now.

When the cake has been out of the oven for about 10 minutes, it’s time to pour the syrup over. Using a skewer or piece of spaghetti, poke holes all over the surface of the cake. Then evenly pour the syrup over the top, letting the cake absorb all that sticky sweetness.

For the glaze, I simply mixed icing sugar and pink grapefruit juice together until I had a runny icing that coats the back of a spoon. Pour over the top of the cake and using a spoon, gently coax it over the sides.

You could of course omit the glaze and serve the cake as it is. I got a little fancy here and decorated it with a dusting of icing sugar and candied grapefruit slices. Absolutely non-essential, but pretty to look at.

I shared this cake with #CookBlogShare, the weekly link party for bloggers hosted this week by everyday healthy recipes

Hijacked By Twins
Recipe of the week, hosted by Emily A Mummy too

Bake of the week, hosted by Helen of Casa Costello and Jenny of Mummy mishaps

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Coconut & Lime Drizzle Loaf Cake

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Happy Friday folks! How can it be the end of another week already?? Time is going so quickly right now. It only just feels like the kids went back to school and in two weeks they will be on hoiday again. Madness.

Anyway I had all good intentions of posting a GBBO themed bake each week, but I have just not had the time to do it. I’m sorry. But I do plan to make it up to you by posting a traybake recipe this weekend – I’ve not been able to get traybakes off my mind since watching the latest episode. Next week is sweet dough which is a particular weakness of mine, so you can bet your bottom dollar I won’t be missing an excuse to bake along with that theme!

This morning I went for a riverside walk with Sam’s class. When I got home I made this very lovely coconut and lime drizzle cake. Who doesn’t love a bit of  drizzle cake? So simple but so good!

Coconut & Lime Drizzle Cake

175g butter
175g caster sugar
Zest of one lime
3 eggs
50g dessicated coconut
175g self raising flour

For the lime drizzle
Juice of one lime
100g caster sugar

Preheat oven to 180c. Grease & line a 2lb loaf tin.

Place the butter, sugar and lime zest together in a large bowl and beat until very light and fluffy. Slowly add the eggs, mixing well after each addition.
Stir in the coconut. Sift in the flour and fold into the mixture.
Pour into tin and bake for 45-50 mins or until risen and a skewer inserted comes out clean.
Just before the cake is due out of the oven, mix together the juice of your lime and 100g sugar.
Leave the cake in tin for five minutes then pierce cake all over with a skewer, going down to the bottom. Slowly pour over the sugary drizzle. Leave to cool completely in tin.

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